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COVID-19 response: What you need to know

2019-2020 Year In Review

An informed campus is a safer campus.

Each year, the University of Illinois Police Department publishes this report of our activity over the previous school year so you have the information you need to protect yourself — and so you can push us to provide better service to our campus community.

Table of contents

 

Message from Chief Alice Cary

Chief Alice Cary
UIPD Police Chief Alice Cary took over as the head of the Division of Public Safety and University of Illinois Police Department in July 2020. You can learn more about her and law enforcement therapy K9 Archie in this Q&A.

The 2019-2020 school year was a year of change.

It was a year of change in that we were all forced to alter our routines. The year ended quite abruptly in the spring when students, faculty and staff were sent home to keep safe from the COVID-19 pandemic. Students were forced to change their study habits. Faculty were forced to adapt to a virtual learning environment. And UIPD was forced to change the way it approached public safety — quickly shifting its focus from law enforcement to public health.

It was a year of change across the country. Civil demonstrations gripped our community in the weeks and months following the police-involved death of George Floyd in Minneapolis. Maybe never before has policing and its effect on communities of color been more in the national spotlight.

So much so that this very report has changed. We have altered this year’s issue from what we have offered in the past to give our community members more insight into our own approaches to policing in the context of how they affect people of color in our own community. The data and information in this report is presented without an agenda — we simply want you to have the information you need to make informed decisions and push us to do a better job.

I sincerely believe that UIPD is a leader in campus safety and progressive policing. It is codified in our mission, vision and values. We are committed to instilling 21st Century Policing principles into every interaction we have. In 2019, we formalized the adoption of 10 principles we share with the NAACP.

But no organization is perfect, and we are no exception. We will always strive to take a critical look at how we serve, and to improve our policies and practices to promote equity on campus and beyond.

Without a doubt, 2020 has been a tough year on many of us. But I see it as a year filled with opportunity. There have been opportunities for UIPD to rethink the way we do things and to enhance our service to the community. A lot changed this year — but if we work together as a community, change can be a great thing.

Sincerely,

Alice Cary
Chief of Police and Executive Director of Public Safety

 

Beginnings and endings

Staff and sworn personnel of the University of Illinois Police Department work hard every day to make our campus community a safer place to live work, and study for all students, staff, faculty and visitors. Those who work at the Division of Public Safety ingrain our three core values — justice, respect and integrity — into everything they do.

We are committed to the constitutional idea of justice where every person is treated with dignity and fairness. We value human life and safety, and we strive to be examples of candor, honesty and ethical behavior. We work hard to protect you and to help all of our students, faculty and staff thrive. Our foremost priority is and always will be the safety of our campus community members and visitors.

We extend a warm welcome to those who have joined the committed staff of the Division of Public Safety in the past year, and we would like to extend our most sincere thanks and gratitude to those who have retired from a career of service to our community.

New team members

Officer Rachael Bishop

Officer Rachael Bishop

Officer Bishop has worked as a volunteer firefighter and as a nuclear security officer for Exelon. She holds a degree in Sport Management from Millikin University, and she is a graduate of Villa Grove High School. She played softball during her time at Millikin.
 

Peyton Childress

Emergency Management Training Coordinator Peyton Childress

Peyton previously worked as an administrative assistant at the Mahomet Police Department. She is a graduate of Eastern Illinois University, where she earned a degree in health studies with an option in emergency management and disaster preparedness. She has a number of healthcare certifications, including experience on the decontamination team at Carle.
 

Officer Ben Crane

Officer Ben Crane

Officer Crane grew up in Champaign-Urbana and current lives in Mahomet. He is a 2005 graduate of Parkland College and a 2008 graduate of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He served our country as an officer in the U.S. Army from 2008 to 2016, and he is now a company commander in the Army Reserves.
 

Officer Karl Germany

Officer Karl Germany

Officer Germany joined the University of Illinois Police Department in September 2020. He transferred to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign from Western Illinois University, where he learned the dynamics of policing in a campus environment.
 

Officer Kennedy Hartman

Officer Kennedy Hartman

Officer Hartman obtained a bachelor’s degree in Psychology from Webster University in St. Louis and attended Parkland College. In addition, she played basketball at Webster and Parkland. She attended Unity High School.
 

Telecommunicator Daniel Kunde

Telecommunicator Daniel Kunde

TC Kunde started as a member of our Student Patrol team — at one point earning our Student Patrol Officer of the Year award — while he completed his undergraduate degree at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. After he graduated, he worked as a security officer and dispatcher at Millikin University before returning to UIPD in October 2019.
 

Security Guard Mark Laughlin

Security Guard Mark Laughlin

Mr. Laughlin joined Public Safety as a University Housing Security Officer in February 2020. He comes to the U. of I. after working for several years for Fed Ex Ground, Swann Special Care facility in Champaign and as an elementary school teacher in California. He resides in Champaign with his wife.
 

Officer Valerie Marcotte

Officer Valerie Marcotte

Officer Marcotte previously worked as a certified nursing assistant at Carle Foundation Hospital, where she was a member of the high-risk obstetrics unit. She holds a bachelor’s degree in nursing from Olivet Nazarene University.
 

Security Guard Mark Laughlin

Security Guard Lisa Neal

Ms. Neal joined Public Safety as a University Housing Security Officer in February 2020. She comes to the U. of I. after working several years as a shipping clerk at Danville Metal Stamping in Danville, Illinois. She currently resides with her son in Vermilion County.
 

 

Retirements

Officer Shawn Johnson

Officer Shawn Johnson

Officer Johnson retired in 2020 after nearly 24 years with the University of Illinois Police Department. Johnson spent much of his career as a patrol officer, building positive relationships with campus community members.
 

Officer George Sandwick

Officer George Sandwick

Officer Sandwick retired in 2020 after nearly 25 years. Officer Sandwick was instrumental in creating and coordinating the UIPD motorcycle unit. He also retired as UIPD’s “Badge One” officer, which is presented to the officer with the most years of service to the community.
 

Lieutenant John Brown

Lieutenant John Brown

Lieutenant Brown retired in 2020 after nearly 30 years of service to the campus community. At the time of his retirement, Lt. Brown supervised UIPD patrol operations and coordinated the region’s mobile field force.
 
 

Deputy Chief Matt Myrick

Deputy Chief Matt Myrick

Deputy Chief Myrick retired in 2020 after 31 years in public safety, including 24 at UIPD. Myrick recently served as the department’s interim chief of police (twice) while the department underwent transitions in leadership.
 

 

Crime statistics

We have a very safe campus, but no community will ever be entirely crime-free.

Crime in the campus area has neither increased nor has it declined substantially in recent years. We make these crime statistics available so you can review the trends for yourself and use this information to make the best decisions about your personal safety. Some key points to highlight:

  • Theft is and likely will always be the most common crime on campus. It’s also easily preventable. Remember to lock your personal belongings at all times, and never leave valuables unattended in public.
  • Violence against women continues to be an elevated issue on college campuses across the country, and ours is no exception. There are resources available for anyone who has experienced this kind of violence or who wants to support someone who has.
  • Bicycle and pedestrian safety is a priority, but vehicles continue to be the most common source of traffic violations. UIPD issued only 6 total bicycle and pedestrian tickets for the entire 2019-2020 school year, whereas vehicle accounted for several hundred.
  • 2019 marked the first year that the recreational use of marijuana under certain conditions was legal in Illinois. Because violations of these new conditions may result in a non-criminal citation, the number of tickets issued in the drug category below was higher.
  • We continue to make use of the student disciplinary system — not the legal system — for alcohol violations, like underage drinking and public possession of alcohol. We believe that these issues are better addressed through the school and not in court.

An important note about these crime statistics: This is a separate set of statistics from what can be found in our Annual Security and Fire Safety Report. There are two important reasons why these numbers appear different: (1) these statistics are presented for the previous school year (July 2019 through June 30), whereas the Clery crime statistics follow the calendar year, and (2) federal disclosure mandates in the Clery Act require us to track and count Clery crime statistics differently than our own crime statistics, whereas the below statistics are simply a representation of all calls throughout the year to which UIPD responded.


 

How Illinois Compares

We surveyed our peer institutions to see how our campus stacks up in terms of safety — and we are providing you with the data so you have the information you need to keep yourself and others safe.

Note that this is Clery data from the calendar year 2018 — the most recent available for all schools. In 2020, each school had until December to publish their 2019 data, and we will update this comparison as soon as that data is available. The 2019 data for the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is already available.

Learn more about these statistics.

Murder

California (Berkeley) – 0
California (San Diego) – 0
Illinois – 0
Indiana – 0
Iowa – 0
Maryland – 0
Michigan – 0
Michigan State – 0
Minnesota – 0
Nebraska – 0
North Carolina – 0
Northwestern – 0
Ohio State – 0
Penn State – 0
Purdue – 0
Rutgers – 0
Texas (Austin) – 0
UCLA – 0
Virginia – 0
Washington (Seattle) – 0
Wisconsin – 0

Negligent Manslaughter

Minnesota – 1
California (Berkeley) – 0
California (San Diego) – 0
Illinois – 0
Indiana – 0
Iowa – 0
Maryland – 0
Michigan – 0
Michigan State – 0
Nebraska – 0
North Carolina – 0
Northwestern – 0
Ohio State – 0
Penn State – 0
Purdue – 0
Rutgers – 0
Texas (Austin) – 0
UCLA – 0
Virginia – 0
Washington (Seattle) – 0
Wisconsin – 0

Robbery

California (Berkeley) – 40
Minnesota – 14
UCLA – 11
Washington (Seattle) – 10
Wisconsin – 9
Iowa – 8
Illinois – 6
North Carolina – 6
Ohio State – 6
Rutgers – 6
Texas – 5
Indiana – 4
Penn State – 4
Michigan – 3
Virginia – 3
California (San Diego) – 2
Michigan State – 2
Nebraska – 2
Maryland – 1
Northwestern – 0
Purdue – 0

Aggravated Assault

Iowa – 42
California (Berkeley) – 41
Wisconsin – 39
UCLA – 26
Michigan – 24
Michigan State – 24
Washington (Seattle) – 22
Minnesota – 14
Texas – 14
Indiana – 13
Illinois – 12
Ohio State – 12
Penn State – 11
California (San Diego) – 10
Virginia – 9
Nebraska – 9
Maryland – 6
Rutgers – 5
Purdue – 5
Northwestern – 3
North Carolina – 1

Rape

Ohio State – 111
Washington (Seattle) – 70
Penn State – 69
UCLA – 54
Iowa – 50
Michigan – 48
Illinois – 37
Michigan State – 34*
Minnesota – 32
California (Berkeley) – 28
Virginia – 28
Maryland – 28
North Carolina – 26
Purdue – 25
Indiana – 22
Texas – 18
California (San Diego) – 18
Wisconsin – 17
Rutgers – 17
Nebraska – 16
Northwestern – 8

*The purpose of this survey is to approximate — as closely as possible — how Illinois compares to peer institutions under normal circumstances on a year-to-year basis. For that reason, crimes committed by MSU physician Larry Nassar were not included in this survey because they occurred over a number of years. For more information, please consult the Michigan State University Annual Security and Fire Safety Report.

Fondling

Ohio State – 55
Iowa – 47
Michigan – 37
Penn State – 33
Minnesota – 28
UCLA – 26
Washington (Seattle) – 25
Illinois – 23
California (San Diego) – 18
Virginia – 16
Wisconsin – 16
Maryland – 15
Purdue – 14
Michigan State – 12*
California (Berkeley) – 11
Indiana – 11
North Carolina – 9
Nebraska – 8
Rutgers – 7
Northwestern – 3
Texas – 2

*The purpose of this survey is to approximate — as closely as possible — how Illinois compares to peer institutions under normal circumstances on a year-to-year basis. For that reason, crimes committed by MSU physician Larry Nassar were not included in this survey because they occurred over a number of years. For more information, please consult the Michigan State University Annual Security and Fire Safety Report.

Incest

California (Berkeley) – 0
California (San Diego) – 0
Illinois – 0
Indiana – 0
Iowa – 0
Maryland – 0
Michigan – 0
Michigan State – 0
Minnesota – 0
Nebraska – 0
North Carolina – 0
Northwestern – 0
Ohio State – 0
Penn State – 0
Purdue – 0
Rutgers – 0
Texas (Austin) – 0
UCLA – 0
Virginia – 0
Washington (Seattle) – 0
Wisconsin – 0

Statutory Rape

California (San Diego) – 1
UCLA – 1
Penn State – 1
California (Berkeley) – 0
Illinois – 0
Indiana – 0
Iowa – 0
Maryland – 0
Michigan – 0
Michigan State – 0
Minnesota – 0
Nebraska – 0
North Carolina – 0
Northwestern – 0
Ohio State – 0
Purdue – 0
Rutgers – 0
Texas (Austin) – 0
Virginia – 0
Washington (Seattle) – 0
Wisconsin – 0

Arson

Ohio State – 6
UCLA – 5
Michigan – 4
Illinois – 4
California (Berkeley) – 4
Penn State – 3
Purdue – 3
Indiana – 3
California (San Diego) – 2
Iowa – 2
Maryland – 2
Washington (Seattle) – 1
Wisconsin – 1
North Carolina – 1
Nebraska – 1
Rutgers – 1
Northwestern – 1
Texas – 1
Michigan State – 0
Minnesota – 0
Virginia – 0

Domestic Violence

Washington (Seattle) – 59
Rutgers – 54
Ohio State – 37
UCLA – 33
Illinois – 32*
Iowa – 23
Virginia – 14
California (Berkeley) – 14
Minnesota – 13
California (San Diego) – 12
Michigan – 10
Wisconsin – 6
North Carolina – 5
Nebraska – 5
Texas – 5
Indiana – 4
Northwestern – 3
Penn State – 2
Maryland – 2
Purdue – 2
Michigan State – 1

*The state of Illinois does not define dating violence. All incidents that would otherwise be classified as dating violence are counted in the domestic violence category.

Dating Violence

Ohio State – 36
Penn State – 29
Iowa – 28
Washington (Seattle) – 26
Minnesota – 20
Maryland – 19
Michigan State – 19
California (Berkeley) – 18
Purdue – 17
Virginia – 16
California (San Diego) – 12
Indiana – 12
Nebraska – 10
Wisconsin – 8
Michigan – 7
North Carolina – 6
Northwestern – 6
Texas – 5
UCLA – 4
Rutgers – 0
Illinois – 0*

*The state of Illinois does not define dating violence. All incidents that would otherwise be classified as dating violence are counted in the domestic violence category.

Stalking

Washington (Seattle) – 84
Illinois – 67
Iowa – 66
Ohio State – 59
Minnesota – 57
Virginia – 43
Michigan State – 39
Penn State – 36
North Carolina – 33
Indiana – 32
Wisconsin – 32
Texas – 29
Michigan – 21
California (Berkeley) – 20
UCLA – 20
Nebraska – 18
Purdue – 15
California (San Diego) – 15
Maryland – 14
Northwestern – 14
Rutgers – 5

Burglary

Ohio State – 111
UCLA – 110
Indiana – 75
Washington (Seattle) – 71
California (Berkeley) – 65
Minnesota – 60
Michigan State – 51
Wisconsin – 48
California (San Diego) – 35
Penn State – 29
Northwestern – 27
Nebraska – 25
North Carolina – 21
Iowa – 18
Purdue – 17
Virginia – 16
Michigan – 16
Illinois – 14
Texas – 11
Rutgers – 8
Maryland – 7

Motor Vehicle Theft

California (Berkeley) – 70
Michigan State – 57
California (San Diego) – 26
Maryland – 25
Minnesota – 24
Texas – 20
Washington (Seattle) – 14
Iowa – 14
Ohio State – 13
UCLA – 11
Michigan – 9
Virginia – 8
Wisconsin – 7
Nebraska – 5
North Carolina – 5
Rutgers – 5
Purdue – 4
Indiana – 3
Penn State – 3
Northwestern – 3
Illinois – 2

Liquor Law Arrests

Penn State – 607
Nebraska – 214
Indiana – 212
Michigan – 84
Ohio State – 67
Iowa – 62
Purdue -51
Minnesota – 46
Virginia – 38
Rutgers – 20
North Carolina – 18
Michigan State – 16
Illinois – 7
California (San Diego) – 6
Wisconsin – 6
California (Berkeley) – 5
Texas (Austin) – 3
Washington (Seattle) – 1
UCLA – 1
Maryland – 0
Northwestern – 0

Liquor Law Disciplinary Referrals

Ohio State – 1356
Wisconsin – 1318
Indiana – 1209
Michigan – 1001
Purdue – 873
Michigan State – 838
Penn State – 812
Washington (Seattle) – 734
Minnesota – 732
California (San Diego) – 729
California (Berkeley) – 651
North Carolina – 553
Iowa – 546
Virginia – 449
Maryland – 441
Nebraska -430
UCLA – 382
Illinois – 249
Northwestern – 216
Texas (Austin) – 107
Rutgers – 10

Drug Law Arrests

Penn State – 325
Rutgers – 289
Indiana – 253
Nebraska – 252
Purdue – 173
Texas (Austin) – 142
Iowa – 114
Michigan – 88
North Carolina – 64
Michigan State – 60
California (Berkeley) – 58
Ohio State – 57
UCLA – 42
Minnesota – 33
California (San Diego) – 32
Wisconsin – 25
Virginia – 25
Illinois – 25
Maryland – 13
Washington (Seattle) – 9
Northwestern – 0

Drug Law Disciplinary Referrals

Indiana – 476
Michigan State – 457
Ohio State – 352
Washington (Seattle) – 318
Wisconsin – 252
Penn State – 234
California (San Diego) – 201
Minnesota – 163
Michigan – 140
California (Berkeley) – 111
Rutgers – 108
Purdue – 91
UCLA – 87
Nebraska – 72
North Carolina – 72
Illinois – 54
Iowa – 45
Texas (Austin) – 42
Virginia – 30
Northwestern – 5
Maryland – 4

Weapons Arrests

California (Berkeley) – 19
Michigan State – 18
UCLA – 13
Nebraska – 10
Wisconsin – 9
Rutgers – 9
Ohio State – 5
California (San Diego) – 5
Michigan – 5
North Carolina – 5
Virginia – 4
Penn State – 2
Minnesota – 2
Iowa – 2
Texas (Austin) – 2
Maryland – 2
Indiana – 1
Washington (Seattle) – 1
Illinois – 1
Purdue – 0
Northwestern – 0

Weapons Referrals

Ohio State – 11
California (Berkeley) – 8
Michigan – 2
Michigan State – 1
UCLA – 1
Wisconsin – 1
California (San Diego) – 1
North Carolina – 1
Penn State – 1
Iowa – 1
Texas (Austin) – 1
Nebraska – 0
Rutgers – 0
Virginia – 0
Minnesota – 0
Maryland – 0
Indiana – 0
Washington (Seattle) – 0
Illinois – 0
Purdue – 0
Northwestern – 0

Hate Crimes

UCLA – 7
Virginia – 5
California (Berkeley) – 4
Michigan – 4
Wisconsin – 4
Penn State – 4
Indiana – 4
Purdue – 4
Ohio State – 3
California (San Diego) – 3
Michigan State – 2
Iowa – 2
Minnesota – 2
Maryland – 2
Washington (Seattle) – 2
North Carolina – 1
Nebraska – 1
Illinois – 1
Northwestern – 1
Texas (Austin) – 0
Rutgers – 0


About the statistics

The statistics are tracked in compliance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Statistics Act. Please note that comparable schools’ statistics are provided only to put the numbers into context — each school may have circumstances unique to its campus that drives certain statistics up or down. The numbers should be reviewed as a group and not as a comparison between individual schools. For more information, please review the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Annual Security and Fire Safety Report.
 

Arrest Demographics

In 2020, policing and its effect on minority communities came into the national spotlight maybe more than ever before. In the interest of transparency, the University of Illinois Police Department is providing aggregate statistics on the demographics of people arrested and ticketed so that our community members have more information about policing in the Champaign-Urbana community.

In reviewing these statistics, we ask our community members to consider the societal factors which may drive these statistics in one direction or the other. We acknowledge our role in this, and we are always striving to improve our philosophies, training regimens and recruiting efforts to promote equity in our policing strategies. However, systemic inequities permeate our society, and those inequities are reflected in data like these all over the country.

In fact, we present these statistics to put a spotlight on those systemic inequalities.

Every arrest we make is because our officers have probable cause to believe a crime has been committed — race alone is never a reason to stop someone, as it violates UIPD policy and an individual’s civil and constitutional rights. These statistics are influenced in part by factors that have nothing to do with law enforcement — including but not limited to housing opportunity, income equality, employment, and access to mental health resources. These systemic inequalities have consequences for our communities — and for decades, our society has burdened law enforcement with addressing a large portion of those issues.

Addressing these issues must instead be a community effort, and we hope you can join us in that effort.

You can also access a spreadsheet with more data →

Note: The “unspecified” category in each table represents incidents where the information was not provided or expunged records.

UIPD arrests and tickets by race (July 2019 through June 2020)

RACE NUMBER PERCENTAGE
Asian 135 14.3%
Black 402 42.6%
Hispanic 56 5.9%
White 329 34.9%
Unspecified 22 2.3%

 

UIPD arrests and tickets by sex (July 2019 through June 2020)

SEX NUMBER PERCENTAGE
Female 274 29.0%
Male 651 69.0%
Unspecified 19 2.0%

 

UIPD arrests and tickets by age (July 2019 through June 2020)

AGE NUMBER PERCENTAGE
0-17 35 3.7%
18-22 430 45.6%
23-29 225 23.8%
30-39 116 12.3%
40-49 62 6.6%
50-59 32 3.4%
60+ 25 2.7%
Unspecified 19 2.0%

 

Outcome of incident (July 2019 through June 2020)

OUTCOME NUMBER PERCENTAGE
Taken to jail 244 25.8%
Notice to appear 158 16.7%
Promise to comply 399 42.3%
Individual bond 115 12.2%

 

Progressive policing

Former Chief Stone at ceremony
In August 2019, the University of Illinois Police Department formalized the 10 principles it shares with the NAACP. Those shared principles endorse the ideas of procedural justice, transparency, accountability, fairness and impartiality, as well as de-escalation training and increasing diversity in law enforcement. The principles hang in the UIPD briefing room where every patrol officer starts their shift.
 
READ MORE →

We are committed to the administration of law and order based on the constitutional idea of justice where every person will be treated with dignity and fairness. We value our duty in safeguarding constitutional rights in serving and protecting our community.

These are not just words — we seek to put these ideals into action every day.

Read more about our values of justice, respect and integrity →

‘8 Can’t Wait’

In the summer of 2020, there was heightened interest in UIPD policies, particularly those made popular by the national “8 Can’t Wait” campaign.

Here is an overview of our progressive policies, in the context of the eight made popular by that campaign:

  1. UIPD officers are forbidden from using chokeholds. Chokeholds were banned by an Illinois state law enacted in 2016. Additionally, chokeholds have not been a part of UIPD training for years.
     
  2. UIPD officers are trained to use de-escalation first. Cooperation is always the preferred outcome in every interaction we have, and our officers are trained to use de-escalation techniques to help achieve that goal. Through policy and training, our officers make practical attempts at verbal de-escalation before they move to physical use of force, and those decisions are based on the actions and words of the person with whom an officer is interacting. Officers receive training in verbal de-escalation techniques. The University of Illinois Police Training Institute in Champaign is one of the foremost resources on verbal de-escalation, and it is a wonderful resource which we access.
     
  3. UIPD officers are generally required to give a verbal warning to citizens before firing their weapon or using an elevated level of force. UIPD policy states that announcements are to be made “when feasible, and where such action does not increase the level of danger to the officer or others.” We train officers to make announcements, but there are times when the volatility of the situation would not allow for such an announcement.
     
  4. UIPD officers are trained to exhaust all possible options before using deadly force. Deadly force is never the preferred option, and UIPD officers are trained to make attempts to de-escalate when it is practical and safe to do so. However, the most extreme incidents often play out in a matter of seconds or less. When there is not a reasonable opportunity to make attempts at de-escalation, officers are authorized to use the force necessary — including deadly force — if the officer or another person is at imminent risk of death or great bodily harm. The appropriate tactic depends on the situation.
     
  5. UIPD officers are required to intervene if they witness another officer engaged in misconduct. By policy, personnel who witness misconduct or behavior not consistent with UIPD policies are required to report that behavior to a supervisor. Failure to report may result in discipline. Additionally, case law suggests that police officers have an affirmative duty to intercede on behalf of a citizen whose constitutional rights are being violated in their presence by other officers. In cases where someone’s life or safety may be in danger as a result of another officer’s illegal actions, we would expect our officers to intervene.
     
  6. UIPD officers are not prohibited from shooting at moving vehicles. This is the only one of the “8 Can’t Wait” principles not in effect at UIPD. Officers are not authorized to fire at a moving vehicle unless the officer believes that doing so is necessary to defend against imminent death or great bodily harm to the officer or another person. We must be clear — this would occur only under the most extreme scenarios and, even then, is not the preferred option.
     
  7. UIPD officers are trained on a use-of-force continuum. Our officers are trained to respond to the level of resistance exhibited by an individual, and to be prepared to adjust their actions quickly based on the words and actions of the person with whom they are interacting. UIPD policy states that, “the officer shall maintain objectivity and employ reasonable force in reaction to the offender’s behavior through escalation or de-escalation.”
     
  8. UIPD requires comprehensive use of force reporting. Officers must document every time they use force or point a weapon at another person. Every one of those instances is reviewed administratively to ensure that the officer acted in accordance with their training, department policy and state law.

More information is available on the UIPD website about how we serve →

Training

UIPD officers are required to complete training in many categories — and mental health awareness, implicit bias, cultural competency and other topics are among them. This is not a comprehensive list of all the training we do, but here’s a sampling of training UIPD officers completed between July 2019 and June 2020:

COURSE TITLE TOTAL OFFICER HOURS
Crisis Intervention Team Training 120
Cultural competency 3
DiversityEDU20 2
Ethics 96
Hate crime training 13.75
Mental health awareness 128
Mental health intervention and de-escalation 8
Police-citizen relations 5
Preventing harassment and discrimination 140
The Great Reset 1.5

 

Our budget

The University of Illinois Police Department works hard to keep the community safe while being responsible custodians of public resources.

From July 2019 to June 2020, the total Division of Public Safety budget was about $8.2 million. Here’s how we spent that money:


 

A U. of I. Wellness Support Ambassador holds a test vial outside of a COVID-19 test location near Foellinger Auditorium. The division’s Office of Campus Emergency Management played a critical role in keeping our campus safe during the pandemic.

Our work

In 2020, the idea of public safety became a lot bigger than just policing.

COVID-19 first hit the Division of Public Safety radar in January 2020 through the campus Infectious Disease Working Group, which is chaired by members of our Office of Campus Emergency Management. The group quickly scaled up to work out a campus response.

Though this emergency was unprecedented, it was not unexpected. Infectious disease was previously identified in the Campus Emergency Operations Plan as the No. 2 most likely natural hazard to threaten our campus (severe weather is No. 1).

Since January, our Office of Campus Emergency Management has been working to mitigate the spread of COVID-19 on campus, and to coordinate a collaborative, harmonized campus response. Our emergency management office also works at the county level through the Champaign County Emergency Operations Center to ensure that the Champaign-Urbana and surrounding community has the resources it needs to continue operating safely.

Working through existing early-warning systems and long-established emergency operations protocols, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign campus was able to safely bring students back for on-campus learning during the fall 2020 semester.

Although our community has never faced a challenge like COVID-19, we were prepared to respond quickly — thanks in large part to our Office of Campus Emergency Management and the collaboration of students, faculty and staff across campus.

 

Resources

To report a crime, ask a question or make a suggestion, you can contact us at any time:

University of Illinois Police Department
1110 W. Springfield Ave. Urbana, IL 61801
Emergency: 911
Non-emergency: 217-333-1216
police.illinois.edu
police@illinois.edu

Visit us on social media to stay informed about public safety issues on campus:
Facebook
Twitter
Instagram
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Walk in groups. Call between 9 a.m. and 2:30 a.m. throughout the year for a walking escort from SafeWalks:
217-333-1216

Sign up for emergency text message notifications:
police.illinois.edu/safe

Information about sexual misconduct response, prevention and reporting options:
wecare.illinois.edu

Visit the Counseling Center to learn more about resources available at the university:
counselingcenter.illinois.edu

Register your bicycle to protect it from thieves:
go.illinois.edu/mybike

Learn more about what you can do to keep yourself safe on campus:
police.illinois.edu/safety